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Persistent URL http://purl.org/net/epubs/work/35151
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Record Id 35151
Title Environments, Methodologies and Languages for Supporting Users in building a Chemical Ontology
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Abstract Ontologies are widely used by different communities for several purposes. With the advent of the Semantic Web, ontologies are becoming increasingly popular amongst members of the scientific community. This is because they provide a powerful way to formally express the nature of a domain or subject area. By defining shared and common domain theories, ontologies help both people and machines to communicate concisely, which promotes knowledge reuse and integration. During the process of building an ontology several questions arise related to the methodologies, tools and languages that should be used in the process of development. The Council for the Central Laboratory of the Research Councils (CCLRC) is developing a Data Portal to store and retrieve experimental data from across the spectrum of the sciences. Ontologies are a key part of this effort as they are used to provide a common indexing mechanism for these data. Therefore this dissertation aims to review how simple tools and techniques can be used to gather ontological information from a community as a form of consensus building. This project is part of a wider effort by the Council for the Central Laboratory of the Research Councils CCLRC to develop a data portal to store and retrieve experimental data from across the spectrum of the sciences. This dissertation discusses how simple tools and techniques can be used to gather ontological information from a community as a form of consensus building. After looking at a number of tools, Protégé and the web ontology language (OWL) were chosen as the best combination for building both heavy and lightweight ontologies. Using these tools, a Topic Map of Chemistry was converted into an ontology. Due to their lack of formal semantics SKOS (Simple knowledge Organisation systems) and topic maps proved unsuitable for building heavy weight ontologies.
Organisation CCLRC , ESC , ESC-DMG
Keywords Chemistry , Ontology , Chemical Ontology
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Language English (EN)
Type Details URI(s) Local file(s) Year
Thesis MSc Bioinformatics/Computational Biology Thesis. Dissertation.pdf 2005
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